September 2021

Do you remember the time when Monday was always washing day and the best way to get the water out of your washing was to put it through the mangle, and the way to dry your clothes on a wet day was to use a clothes horse, not a tumble-dryer. Those were the days!

Here's an amusing poem about other people’s clotheslines and what we can learn from them!


The clothesline

A clothesline was a news forecast to neighbours passing by,
There were no secrets you could keep when clothes were hung to dry.

It also was a friendly link for neighbours always knew
if company had stopped on by to spend a night or two
For then you’d see the ‘fancy sheets’ and towels upon the line:
you’d see the ‘company table cloths’ with intricate designs.

The line announced a baby’s birth, from folks who lived inside
as brand new infant clothes were hung so carefully with pride!
The ages of the children could so readily be known
by watching how the sizes changed, you’d know how much they’d grown!

It also told when illness struck, as extra sheets were hung;
Then nightclothes and a bathrobe too, haphazardly were strung.

It also said ‘on holiday now’ when lines hung limp and bare
It told ‘we’re back now!’ when full lines sagged with not an inch to spare!

New folks in town were scorned upon if wash was dingy and grey
As neighbours carefully raised their brows, and looked the other way.

But clotheslines now are of the past, for dryers make work much less
Now what goes on inside a house is anybody’s guess!
I really miss that way of life, it was a friendly sign
when neighbours knew each other best … by what hung on the line.

 


August 2021

One of the many joys of the Memory Café is having time to chat with other people about all sorts of things including families, hobbies and holidays, but one topic that always sparks interest is what work people have done over the years. Whether it be during the war years, within the home or in the wider world there is always a tale to tell.
We like to link our themes to fun activities so below there are two different challenges for you to try:


                                 Trivia Quiz based on occupations.

1. What job did George Formby sing about? .........................................

2. Benny Hill’s ‘Ernie’ was the fastest  ............................... in the west.
 
3. This person (Pat) had a black and white cat – Pat was a ........................ 
 
4. Dolly Parton’s hours of work were .....................  to ........................
 
5. Bobby Darin sang ‘If I were a ............................ and you were a lady’
 
6 .Lonnie Donegan’s old man was a ..............................
 
7. Oh ..................., ..................., won’t you marry me with your musket, fife and drum. 
 
8. What shall we do with a drunken .....................................?
 
9. Little Bow Peep’s  job – she was a .....................................
 
10. Old MacDonald was a ........................................ (E-I-E-I-O)
 
 
Now for something different – try the ‘Hidden Occupation Challenge’
 
Can you find, and underline, the hidden jobs in the following sentences?

Example:  I have ten sweets.  The hidden job is ‘vet’   (have ten). 

 

Good luck!

 

  •    Did you see that squirrel grab a kernel of corn? 
  •    Without much effort, Jean finished the test?
  •    Moscow boys are much like the boys in America
  •    Have you tried nutty pistachio ice cream?
  •    Count each error and deduct ten for each mistake.
  •    That sedan certainly looks expensive.
  •    Would you rather have plum, berry or apple jelly?
  •    If you see a wasp you should not bother it.
  •    This tart is the best I’ve ever tasted.
  •    Some countries refused to sign the pact or any treaty.

July 2021

Do you recall those schooldays when you had a few minutes to spare at the end of a lesson and the teacher would decide to give the class a pencil and paper activity?  These could be games such as hangman, noughts and crosses, battleships and, more often than not, a spelling bee!  There is something challenging about having to find words within the long word and only using the letters in it.  I remember a common word used at school was chrysanthemum!

At the Memory Café we often have challenging activities to keep our brains active and to work alongside other people, so here is a spelling bee you might like to try! The word ‘pedestrian’ can make well over 50 words, but to give you a start here are clues of 20 words you can make from using letters found in PEDESTRIAN:

On a piece of paper write down all the words you (and other people) can make from PEDESTRIAN ?